Mild Topical Steroid Withdrawal

Mild Topical Steroid Withdrawal is a common skin condition that can affect people who are slowly, or abruptly, discontinuing the use of topical steroids. The most common symptom of mild Topical Steroid Withdrawal is red, dry, itchy, skin, and is often called Red Skin Syndrome. Mild Topical Steroid Withdrawal can last for long periods of time and may come and go in flares. It can often be confused with eczema as the skin is often a hybrid of both. While there is no cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal, there are treatments available that can help to manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. In this article, we will discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for mild TSW.

The symptoms of Topical Steroid Withdrawal can often present itself as mild to begin with. Prolonged use and misuse of topical steroids can further exacerbate the symptoms to a more severe state when the patient discontinues the application of the steroid creams. 

topical steroid withdrawal face topical steroid withdrawal leg

 

Mild TSW while gradually tapering off steroid creams

The taper method, which involves the slow gradual decrease of the use of topical steroids is a common method used however there is scarce data on the efficacy of this method. During the taper method, mild symptoms can frequently appear but are often not as severe as quitting topical steroids cold turkey.

The challenge with quitting topical steroids cold turkey vs the taper method is that both require an extended duration of time and information is scarce on which method is the most effective. Within the community, there has been anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of both.

 

Triggers

As the body goes through a withdrawal period from topical steroids, exposure to certain irritants or allergens can trigger  flares. Common triggers include:

Dry skin: When the skin is dry, it is more susceptible to irritation and inflammation. This can cause the onset of mild TSW symptoms.

Irritants: Certain substances, such as soap, detergent, or pollen, can irritate the skin and trigger a flare.

Allergens: People with Topical Steroid Withdrawal may be allergic to certain substances, such as dust mites or pet dander. These allergens can trigger a severe reaction known as anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening.

Stress: Stress has been shown to worsen Topical Steroid Withdrawal symptoms.

 

Symptoms of mild TSW

Also referred to as Red Skin Syndrome, the most common symptom of mild Topical Steroid Withdrawal is dry, itchy skin. The skin may appear red and inflamed, and it may be cracked or crusted. In severe cases, the skin may bleed. It can also cause swelling and blistering. Symptoms usually worsen at night.

Treatments

There is no cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal, but there are treatments available that can help to manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. 

Treatment options include:

Topical treatments: Topical treatments are creams or ointments that are applied directly to the skin. They can help to soothe itching and inflammation. Common topical treatments for mild TSW can include natural balms, calcineurin inhibitors, antihistamines, and moisturizers.

Systemic treatments: Systemic treatments are medications that are taken orally or injected. They work by suppressing the immune system and reducing inflammation. Common medical systemic treatments for Topical Steroid Withdrawal include oral corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and biologics. Throughout online communities, there are hundreds of stories emerging that oral steroids treatment may only delay the symptoms of topical steroid withdrawal, causing widespread TSW and eczema symptoms across the whole body after the treatment. More research is required to support this.

Light therapy: Light therapy, also known as phototherapy, involves exposing the skin to ultraviolet light. This treatment can help to reduce inflammation and improve the appearance of the skin.

 

Mild Topical Steroid Withdrawal is a growing chronic condition that can be difficult to manage. More people learn about the dangers of long term topical steroid use and the withdrawal symptoms that can take place upon stopping the application of these creams. This is resulting in a gradual discontinuation and topical steroids, resulting in hybrid symptomatic skin of TSW and the underlying skin condition.  However, with the proper awareness, lifestyle changes, and treatments, most people with Topical Steroid Withdrawal can find relief from their mild symptoms and improve their quality of life.

At TSW Assist we are gathering crowd sourced solutions from the community on the most effective ways to manage the inflammation and symptoms associated with Topical Steroid Withdrawal. We have also put together some products recommended by the community to assist with the symptoms of TSW.

 

How I Tapered Down From Using A Super Potent Topical Steroid Cream for Over 20 Years

My name is Jason Vergara. I’m from Sydney, Australia and the founder of TSW Assist. This is my personal journey of how I tapered down from using Diprosone to no longer using any steroid creams at all. Diprosone is an ultra-strength highly-potent steroid cream that is up to 600 times as potent as low level hydrocortisone cream. It is commonly prescribed by doctors to treat eczema in adults and children.

In 2015, I discovered Topical Steroid Withdrawal. For over 20 years, my skin health deteriorated by what I thought was eczema. All the symptoms of TSW exactly matched what I was experiencing with my skin. I decided to stop using corticosteroid creams cold turkey. This sent my skin into severe withdrawal symptoms of cracking, bleeding, and oozing skin. After discontinuing and continuing steroid creams many times, I realized that going cold turkey was too hard for me and I needed to try an alternative option of tapering down.

topical steroid withdrawal face
Flakey, burning, inflamed skin
topical steroid withdrawal finger
Skin atrophy and ripping after years of Diprosone use

 

Wheatgrass Spray

I decided to take the taper approach and gradually work myself down the topical steroid ladder. I stumbled upon Dr. Wheatgrass as it was the only product at the time that actively spoke about Topical Steroid Withdrawal and how their Wheatgrass shots and spray could assist in the taper process.
To my surprise, I was able to email their founder Dr Chris Reynolds directly who was very helpful in providing assistance. He provided a taper chart that allowed me to follow a proper process of tracking my topical steroid use and reducing the application over time. He even provided discounted wholesale prices for me as I told him that I wasn’t in the best financial state.
Over 2 years, the Wheatgrass spray helped me manage the inflammation on my skin and I found it soothing. I managed to taper my steroid use down from twice a day (15 years use) to once every 3 days. However, I just couldn’t make it past the third day. My skin was in a state of limbo and survival and I would plan my lifestyle and events around the days that I could use topical steroids. Eventually, it came to a point where applying the creams once every 3 days did not work, and I would need to get my skin to a stable point by using topical steroids more often again. It felt like 2 steps forward and 3 steps back. At this point I had taken too much time off work and my social life that I decided to look for another solution. I discovered the Dr Aron method.

topical steroid withdrawal leg
Inflammation, bumpy hives

 

The Dr Aron Regimen – a compound cream

The Dr Aron’s Regimen is a treatment method for eczema that makes a compound out of the following:

  • a much weaker steroid
  • an antibiotic cream
  • a moisturizer

It is applied aggressively to begin with (5 x a day) and then eventually tapered down. Within 1 week of being on this compound cream my skin was the best it had ever been. The antibiotic cream to treat the underlying staph seem to work wonders and my skin was miraculously healed. Smooth, spotless and healthy. I felt a new sense of freedom. I followed the regimen’s advised process of tapering down. It was a very slow taper but it was effective. I lived my best life. I went traveling overseas, played sports, ate anything I wanted, and binge drank alcohol at parties.

In Osaka with my partner

I managed to follow the slow taper down process to eventually using the compound cream once a day, while my skin remained healthy, unlike when I taper down off pure neat steroids.

Looking back, I got so carried away with life that I completely forgot about my eczema, and forgot about the fact that I was still using steroid creams within Dr Aron’s compound cream. I lived a worry-free life. I drank a lot. I got some tattoos. I ate so much rubbish food. Then one day, after 4 years of using Dr Aron’s cream, it stopped working for me. The compound cream lost its efficacy and I could no longer use it just once a day. I started using it aggressively again, like at the beginning (5 x a day) then tapered down to once a day again. One again my skin miraculously healed. This became a vicious cycle where every time I would try and taper past 1 x application per day my skin would have all the symptoms of withdrawals of topical steroids. Bumpy, cracked, bleeding, pus, oozing, ripping, thin skin etc. I guess I was in denial for 4 years, and secretly I knew that I was still using topical steroids and that this day would come where it stops working and the withdrawal symptoms return.

This was my steroid application and taper process that I was following:

Duration Application
10 days 4 x daily
10 days 3 x daily
10 days 2 x daily
2 weeks 2 x daily
8 weeks 2 x daily, 1 x daily
212121
8 weeks 1 x daily
4 weeks 5 x weekly
4 weeks 4 x weekly
4 weeks 3 x weekly
4 weeks 2 x weekly
4 weeks 1 x weekly

 

Lifestyle and diet

I decided to clean up my lifestyle. I tried every diet under the sun – veganism, vegetarianism, carnivore, organic, Karen Fischer’s eczema diet, intermittent fasting, 24-72 hour fasts, no sugar. I also tried the elimination diet where I would cut out major food groups and re-introduce them 1 by 1. This destroyed my body and I became nutrient deficient. I lost 12kg in 2 weeks and developed food anxiety.
The diet that worked best for me was a balance of protein, healthy fats, lots of fruits and veggies, and no sugar and alcohol.
When I started fuelling my body with nutritious food, while still trying to taper off Dr Aron’s compound cream, I was able to taper down to only using the cream once every 2 days. This was a huge milestone for me, but I still couldn’t get past using it once every 3 days. The TSW symptoms would always come back.

 

Supplementation

Next, I decided to add some supplements to my health regime. I started seeing a naturopath who put me on an array of supplements such as zinc, magnesium, b vitamins. We also did a gut healing program with different strains of probiotics. We worked on adrenal support and sleep quality. The gut healing program and supplements really helped me. I became less intolerant to many foods that would previously make me itchy and red. The zinc helped my wound healing and the magnesium improved my quality of sleep. I was also taking a product called Adrenotone to help with adrenal support and fatigue. I also started taking Lion’s Mane, a medicinal mushroom that helps with cognitive function and nerve support, as well as Cordyceps to assist with non caffeinated energy.
After combining a clean balanced diet, no alcohol and vitamin supplementation I was able to taper down the Dr Aron compound to once every 3 days. It was fantastic but after a while, I could not make it past once every 2 days again!

 

Coronavirus

At this point it was February 2020. The global coronavirus pandemic shut down the whole world. I lost my job and was stuck in my apartment. I felt defeated and exhausted but saw this as an opportunity to finally quit topical steroids cold turkey. I decided not use the compound cream for 1 week. After the 7th day, my skin became the worst it’s ever been. All the symptoms of Topical Steroid Withdrawal were back in full-effect. I lost the ability to thermoregulate while my skin ripped, bled and oozed. My hair began to fall out and I became extremely itchy. There was no medical support, no solutions. Everything that I did up until that moment was trial and error and I felt like I was back at square one. A dark depression loomed over me but I didn’t let this overtake me. Over the years, I learnt a lot about my body and what helped me heal – proper nutritious food and specific supplements. This gave me hope.

topical steroid withdrawal flaking face skin
My whole face was shedding skin constantly. After 1 layer peels off, the layer underneath peels off within the next 24 hours. Pus and liquid would also ooze out.
topical steroid withdrawal hand
Itchy, bumpy hives that would ooze out with liquid

Mental health, mindfulness, meditation and manifestation.

It was through some very dark days during the 2020 pandemic that the only thing I could do was pray and meditate. My physical world was a brutal pain, but in my mind, the possibilities were endless. I started reading books that would help me alleviate the anxiety and depression in my mind. I practiced daily meditation, mindfulness and became quite spiritual. The more I calmed my mind, and unidentified with my body, the more peaceful I felt, regardless if my skin was on fire. I learnt about the power of the mind and bought all of Joe Dispenza’s books and courses about healing yourself with your mind. I read the Power of Now by Eckart Tolle. This shift in mindset was the greatest investment and longest lasting improvement I have ever made for my mental health. In a period of hopeless iatrogenic illness caused by pharmaceutical drugs, alternative solutions through mental health gave me solace.

I relapsed

After 1 month of severe Topical Steroid Withdrawal symptoms, I gave in. I hadn’t slept for days. I sat in the dark with the curtains closed everyday. I was scared to eat anything and lost 10kg. I was scared to shower. I couldn’t do it anymore. I needed rest. I needed a break from my suffering. I needed steroid creams.
I decided to use Dr Aron’s compound cream again. But this time it was different. I would use the compound cream to get my skin back to a healthy state, and once again, try and taper down.
This time, I had a new mental approach. A new mindset! A firm belief that I would be healed. Zero doubts. Inspired with fierce intention, manifestation and an unwavering faith that if my mind truly believes my skin will be healed, my body will follow. And so I started using the Dr Aron compound cream, again.

topical steroid withdrawal leg
Infected and inflamed leg
topical steroid withdrawal hand palm
Dyshidrotic eczema that would rip, bleed and ooze

 

Cold exposure

During the same time, I also discovered the Wim Hof Method and cold therapy exposure. I did his online course and religiously practiced deep breathing techniques, cold showers and ice baths. The cold showers worked wonders for the inflammation, my immune system, and significantly reduced the flare ups.

At this point it was September 2020, and with nutritious food, supplementation, daily meditation, cold showers, deep breathing exercises, journalling and positive and shift in mindset, I felt like I had all the essential tools to taper off steroid creams successfully. I followed the taper process again and managed to taper down to once every 3 days. This was my biggest milestone yet. I was slowly solving my own personal health code of tapering down from steroids. My body and skin were responding really well!

There was one thing however, that I could not get rid of. I was always itchy. Even though my skin was in a good state, I couldn’t shake off this bone-deep itch that I had. It was everywhere. I was convinced that I was not actually itchy, and it was a deeply ingrained behavioral habit that I developed from 25 years of eczema. I decided to see a hypnotist to tap into my subconscious and make me stop this habitual scratching. After my first and only consultation with the hypnotist, she told me that ethically she cannot hypnotize me to stop scratching. This was because I actually had the physiological health condition of eczema and that I was actually itchy – it’s not a subconscious habit. To my absolute luck, she has a teenage daughter who also had severe eczema and had bad experiences from stopping steroid creams. She suggested that I see a Traditional Chinese Medicine doctor who has helped her daughter.

 

Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine was the last piece of the puzzle of my own personal healing journey. I started receiving acupuncture and herbal teas from a Traditional Chinese Medicine skin specialist. (When I was a young child, my parents took me to a TCM doctor, but at the time we were lost in translation and didn’t give it the time and attention that it deserved. Also, I’m not sure if the TCM doctor we visited actually specialized in skin health.)
As a 31 year old adult, I am now a huge advocate of TCM. After 1 month of treatment, my skin was the smoothest it has been in 20 years. And it wasn’t just cosmetic and aesthetic. Internally I started to feel stronger and healthier. My asthma cleared up, my nose stopped running, I had regular bowel movements, my sleep improved significantly. During this time I was still using the Dr Aron cream once every 3 days. I was scared to stop in fear that all this money and effort would go to waste and TSW would override everything, but I was adamant to get off topical steroids for good. And so I committed to taper further.

I received ongoing TCM treatment for 1 year, whilst tapering down the application of the Dr Aron compound. I maintained my meditation, stretching, light exercise, healthy nutritious food, supplementation, cold showers, and deep breathing exercises. My skin stayed healthy, free of TSW symptoms and eczema. I managed to get the application of the Dr Aron command cream down to once every 7 days! At this point, I questioned myself – do I really need to use the steroid compound cream anymore? And so I stopped. 1 week passed, no TSW symptoms. 2 weeks passed. 1 month. 3 months. 6 months. No TSW symptoms. No itching, oozing, bleeding, ripping, temperature fluctuations. Nothing. Only mild nummular eczema spots!

 

Current Day

Today I can say that I haven’t used Topical Steroids in 13 months and my skin is the healthiest it has ever been. I still have cold showers. I still take daily supplements of magnesium, zinc, probiotics, and medicinal mushrooms. Once every two months, I receive acupuncture and take 1 week of TCM herbal teas. I still do daily meditation and work on my mindset, mental health and positive mindfulness. I eat a well balanced meal of protein, carbs and vegetables. I rarely eat sugar and fast food. I don’t drink alcohol anymore. It has been 13 months since I last used topical steroids and I haven’t had any symptoms of TSW at all. My skin continues to get more resilient everyday. I moisturize only once every 2 days. I don’t wake up to skin flakes or blood and pus around me. I go camping once a month. I started Brazilian Jiu Jitsu where I’m grappling with sweaty opponents and my skin can handle it. Currently writing this, it is September 2022, and I’m on the plane to the Philippines for a tropical holiday and to visit my family! I did it. I cracked my own health code and tapered off Diprosone – one of the most potent steroid creams in the world.

For those reading, I am aware that there are many long term TSW sufferers who had their symptoms return after one year or two years. While I cannot rule out that it won’t happen to me, I now have my own unique system and processes to overcome this if the TSW symptoms return.

My dog and I
Healthy skin, wrestling with my dog in Australia
My dad and I
With my dad in The Philippines
Big day of snorkelling and island hopping with my best friend in Boracay

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Did Dr Aron’s Method cause Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

Personally, I believe it only delayed the inevitable. I was already using neat highly potent topical steroid creams for many years before using Dr Aron’s compound cream. The antibiotic component in Dr Aron’s compound cream made a tremendous positive difference to my skin health to treat the underlying staph infection, but the steroid component only delayed the inevitable withdrawal symptoms in my personal experience.
In saying that, I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to use Dr Aron’s method for the years I was using the compound creams. It improved my skin so rapidly and allowed me to live a normal life during the years that it worked for me.

From what I can see in polarizing discussions in online forums and Facebook groups:

  • It has helped thousands of people
  • It may have also caused TSW in many people as they struggled to taper off it

In my personal experience with it, the compound cream became less effective after 4 years, and I had to use more and more aggressively before I could figure out my own way to taper off it. I knew at the back of my mind that I was still using steroid creams and eventually coming off them completely would bring back the withdrawal symptoms.

To be clear, I am not recommending the Dr Aron Method, nor am I disregarding it. I am simply sharing my honest journey with it. Topical Steroid Withdrawal and eczema is very complex and unique to each individual. More research and data is required.

 

Which is better? Tapering vs Cold Turkey TSW?

Unfortunately, I don’t have the right answer for this and I can only share my experience.
There are many people who were able to taper off topical steroids completely. There are also many who claim it only made their topical steroid withdrawal journey worse and delayed the inevitable!

Having tried both methods, in my personal experience, the taper method was less brutal and I was able to live a somewhat normal life, before the symptoms eventually returned.

If you are going through TSW, please do not let my own personal experience impact your judgment or your own personal journey! If you are months or years into your own cold turkey TSW journey and plan to never use topical steroids again, you have my full support and I wholeheartedly admire your courage.

I hope that the crowd sourced solutions on this website can provide you with options and solutions to help you figure out your own success with your topical withdrawal healing journey.

 

Did you ever take oral steroids, such as prednisone?

No, I did not.

 

If you had to do it all again, what would you do differently? What would you do the same?

With the knowledge and experience I have now, as a number 1 priority, I would stop drinking alcohol and consuming sugar.
My second priority would be to start Traditional Chinese Medicine (with a skin specialist not a health generalist) as soon as possible.
I would make sure that I would only have cold showers, eat a nutritious balanced diet, sleep 8 hours a night, and control my stress and anxiety levels through meditation and mindfulness. I would also take zinc, magnesium, probiotics, and do a gut healing program with a naturopath – all while tapering down slowly off steroid creams.
Again, this is my unique personal experience and this is not a recommendation. I am only sharing what worked for me, and unfortunately, it may not work for others. Unfortunately for some people, Traditional Chinese Medicine has not had any positive impact for them – this may because they did not see a TCM dermatologist/skin specialist.

 

Why did you create TSW Assist?

I created TSW Assist because I climbed out of the dark hole that is Topical Steroid Withdrawal. I know there are many people trapped in the dark hole. These were the most physically brutal and psychologically painful years of my life. It tested my mental health and on some dark days I questioned myself if I could keep going. I know that there are hundreds of thousands of people (potentially millions) suffering from this iatrogenic illness.
I don’t have the answers or the cure for this illness, however I cracked my own personal health code and I found some solutions that work for me. Through these crowd sourced recommendations directly from the TSW community on this website, I hope you too can find solutions that can help you beat topical steroid withdrawal.

 

 

Side Effects of Desoximetasone

Desoximetasone is a prescription topical cream used to treat various skin conditions. This medication belongs to a class of drugs called corticosteroids, which work by reducing inflammation in the skin.

What is desoximetasone used for? 

Desoximetasone works by reducing the inflammation and swelling of the affected area. This medication is available in both cream and ointment form. It is used to treat a variety of skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and psoriasis. 

Desoximetasone Brand Names 

Desoximetasone is the generic name used. Below is a list of the brand names used around the world.

 

United States:

  • Topicort
  • Topicort LP

 

Canada:

  • Desoxi
  • Taro-Desoximetasone
  • Topicort Mild

 

United Kingdom and Europe:

  • Topisolon cream

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using desoximetasone? 

Desoximetasone should only be applied to the skin. It should not be applied to the face, groin, or underarms unless your doctor instructs you to.

If the medication needs to be applied near the eyes, avoid getting the medication directly in your eyes because doing so could exacerbate or even start glaucoma. Additionally, avoid getting this medicine in your mouth or nose. Rinse with lots of water if you accidentally get the medication in your eyes, nose, or mouth.

 

How long does desoximetasone stay in your system?

The amount of time that desoximetasone stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that desoximetasone can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Desoximetasone is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of desoximetasone and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use desoximetasone for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of desoximetasone?

According to Mayo Clinic, the side effects of desoximetasone are as follows. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

 

Rare

  • Flushing or redness of the skin
  • redness, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • unusually warm skin

 

Incidence not known

  • Blindness
  • blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin
  • blurred vision
  • decreased vision
  • eye pain
  • headache
  • irritation
  • itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin
  • nausea or vomiting
  • redness and scaling around the mouth
  • tearing
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (eg, between the fingers)
  • thinning, weakness, or wasting away of the skin

 

There are certain potential side effects that often do not require medical treatment. During therapy, these side effects could fade away as your body gets used to the medication. Additionally, your healthcare provider might be able to provide you with information on how to avoid or lessen some of these adverse effects. If any of the following side effects persist, are troublesome, or if you have any questions about them, speak with your doctor:

 

Rare

  • Burning, itching, and pain in hairy areas, or pus at the root of the hair

 

Incidence not known

  • Acne or pimples
  • burning and itching of the skin with pinhead-sized red blisters
  • increased hair growth on the forehead, back, arms, and legs
  • lightening of normal skin color
  • lightening of treated areas of dark skin
  • reddish purple lines on the arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin
  • softening of the skin

Why does desoximetasone burn when I apply it to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying desoximetasone to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Desoximetasone also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

What happens if you use desoximetasone too often?

If you use desoximetasone too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Desoximetasone is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than Desoximetasone?

Desoximetasone is classified as a super-potent strength steroid cream. Weaker steroid creams down the topical steroid ladder include: 

  • Amcinonide
  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Augmented Diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate
  • Hydrocortisone probutate
  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

Which steroid creams are stronger than desoximetasone?

Desoximetasone is among the top steroids in the topical steroid potency chart. Augmented betamethasone dipropionate and clobetasol propionate may be considered stronger than desoximetasone.

Does desoximetasone cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to desoximetasone. Desoximetasone is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just desoximetasone) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many people suffering. 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies. 

 

What is the treatment for topical steroid withdrawal?

 

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

Side Effects of Clobetasol propionate

Clobetasol propionate is a medication that is used to treat various skin conditions. It belongs to a class of medications called corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are hormones that are produced by the body to help regulate many different functions. They are also involved in the body’s response to stress.

What is clobetasol propionate used for?

Clobetasol propionate is used to treat various skin conditions. These include eczema, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin conditions. Clobetasol propionate can be applied to the skin as a cream, ointment, or solution.

 

Clobetasol propionate brand names

Clobetasol propionate is the generic name used. Below are a list of the brand names used around the world.

 

United States and Canada

  • Clobex Lotion, Clobex Shampoo, Clobex Spray, Impelko, Impoyz, Olux, and Olux E

United Kingdom and Europe

  • Dermovate, ClobaDerm and Etrivex

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using clobetasol propionate?

Clobetasol propionate should be avoided on your eyes, nose, mouth, or vagina. Do not use it on skin areas that have cuts, scrapes, or burns.

 

How long does clobetasol propionate stay in your system?

The amount of time that clobetasol propionate stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that clobetasol can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Clobetasol is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of Clobetasol propionate and how long it stays in your system.

According to the NHS, for people who use Clobetasol propionate for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of clobetasol propionate?

According to the Mayoclinic.org, the side effects of clobetasol propionate are as follows:

 

Common side effects

  • Burning or stinging at the application site

 

Less common side effects

  • Burning sensation of the skin
  • dry skin
  • flushing or redness of the skin
  • itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin
  • skin irritation
  • skin rash, encrusted, scaly and oozing
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (eg, between the fingers)

 

Rare side effects

  • Thinning, weakness, or wasting away of the skin
  • Incidence not known
  • Backache
  • blindness
  • blurred vision
  • burning, itching, and pain in hairy areas, or pus at the root of the hair
  • change in vision
  • dry mouth
  • eye pain
  • facial hair growth in females
  • fractures
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • full or round face, neck, or trunk
  • hair loss
  • headache
  • hives
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • irritability
  • loss of sexual desire or ability
  • menstrual irregularities
  • muscle wasting
  • nausea
  • redness and scaling around the mouth
  • stomach pain
  • sugar in the urine
  • sweating
  • tearing
  • thinning of the hair
  • troubled breathing
  • unexplained weight loss
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • Vomiting

Please check with your doctor if any of the above side effects occur. Side effects are more likely if you’re using it for a very long time, or over a large area, or a super potent steroid.

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply clobetasol propionate to my skin?

 

If your skin burns after applying clobetasol propionate to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Cloberasol propionate also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than clobetasol propionate?

Clobetasol propionate is classified as a  Super-potent strength steroid cream. Weaker steroid creams down the topical steroid ladder include: 

  • Amcinonide
  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented Diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate
  • Hydrocortisone probutate
  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than clobetasol propionate?

Clobetasol propionate sits at the top of the topical steroid potency chart. Different types of augmented betamethasone dipropionate may be stronger.

 

What happens when you use clobetasol propionate too often?

If you use clobetasol propionate too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Clobetasol propionate is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does clobetasol propionate cause topical steroid withdrawal?

 

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to Clobetasol propionate. Clobetasol propionate is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just clobetasol propionate) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies. 

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

Side Effects of Halcinonide

Halcinonide is a synthetic corticosteroid. It is structurally similar to other steroids such as cortisol, and has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. A corticosteroid is a type of steroid hormone. Steroid hormones are produced naturally in the body and are involved in many bodily processes such as stress response, immunity, and inflammation. Corticosteroids are synthetic versions of these hormones that are used to treat various conditions.

 

What is Halcinonide used for?

Halcinonide is used topically to treat various skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. It works by reducing inflammation and itchiness. Halcinonide is available in several different formulations for topical use. These include creams, ointments, solutions, foams, and gels. Halcinonide cream is the most commonly used formulation and is available in 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% strengths.

 

Halcinonide brand names

Halcinonide is a generic name for the drug. The brand names for this topical steroid are the following: 

 

United States:

  • Halog

 

Canada:

  • Halog Cream, Halog Ointment, Halog Solution

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using Halcinonide?

This medicine is for use on the skin only. Avoid getting it in your mouth, nose, eyes, or vagina. It should not be applied to skin that has been burned, scraped, or cut. Rinse it off with water as soon as possible if it does get on these locations.

 

Only skin diseases that your doctor is treating with this medication should be used. If you think there might be a skin infection present, specifically, consult your doctor before using it for any other conditions. Certain skin infections or illnesses, like serious burns, shouldn’t be treated with this medication.

 

How long does Halcinonide stay in your system?

The amount of time that halcinonide stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that halcinonide can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Halcinonide is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of Halcinonide and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use halcinonide for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of Halcinonide?

According to Mayo Clinic, use of halcinonide can have side effects.Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

  • Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin
  • irritation
  • itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin
  • redness and scaling around the mouth
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (e.g. between the fingers) 

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply Halcinonide to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying halcinonide to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Halcinonide also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

How do I taper down from using Halcinonide?

To taper down from using halcinonide many doctors advise adjusting to using a weaker steroid cream over an extended period of time. This is commonly known as climbing down the topical steroid ladder.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than Halcinonide?

Halcinonide is a high-potent topical steroid cream. Weaker topical steroid creams down the Topical Steroid Potency Strength Chart are the following: 

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than Halcinonide?

Topical steroid creams that are stronger than halcinonide are as follows: 

 

What happens when you use Halcinonide too often?

If you use halcinonide too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Halcinonide is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does Halcinonide cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to halcinonide. Halcinonide is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

 

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just halcinonide) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies.

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

 

Disclaimer: The information on this website is not medical advice. There is no known medical cure for topical steroid withdrawal, but there are solutions to manage the symptoms and inflammation. It should not be mistaken that all usage of steroid creams will cause topical steroid withdrawal. Corticosteroid creams are the most common medical treatment for eczema worldwide. More clinical research is required to understand the cause of Topical Steroid Withdrawal within an individual.

 

Side Effects of Amcinonide

Amcinonide is a man-made topical corticosteroid. It reduces the actions of chemicals in the body that cause inflammation, redness, and swelling.

 

What is amcinonide used for?

Amcinonide is a glucocorticoid medication. It is used to treat skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. When applied to the skin, amcinonide works by reducing inflammation and itching. It is available as a cream, ointment, or lotion.

 

Amcinonide brand names

Amcinonide is a generic name of the drug. The brand names of this drug are the followng: 

 

United States: 

  • Cyclocort

 

Canada:

  • Amcinonide, Cyclocort Cream, Cyclocort Lotion, Cyclocort Ointment

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using amcinonide?

Only the skin should be used for this medication. Keep it out of your eyes. It should not be applied to skin that has been burned, scraped, or cut. Rinse it off with water as soon as possible if it does get on these locations.

 

Only skin diseases that your doctor is treating with this medication should be used. If you think there might be a skin infection present, specifically, consult your doctor before using it for any other conditions. Certain skin infections or illnesses, like serious burns, shouldn’t be treated with this medication.

 

How long does amcinonide stay in your system?

The amount of time that amcinonide stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that amcinonide can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Amcinonide is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of amcinonide and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use amcinonide for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of amcinonide?

According to Mayo Clinic, use of amcinonide can have side effects. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

  • Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin
  • irritation
  • itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin
  • redness and scaling around the mouth
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (e.g. between the fingers)
  • Acne or pimples
  • burning and itching of the skin with pinhead-sized red blisters
  • burning, itching, and pain in hairy areas, or pus at the root of the hair
  • increased hair growth on the forehead, back, arms, and legs
  • lightening of normal skin color
  • lightening of treated areas of dark skin
  • reddish purple lines on the arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin
  • softening of the skin

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply amcinonide to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying amcinonide to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Amcinonide also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

How do I taper down from using amcinonide?

To taper down from using amcinonide many doctors advise adjusting to using a weaker steroid cream over an extended period of time. This is commonly known as climbing down the topical steroid ladder.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than amcinonide?

According to the Topical Steroid Potency Strength Chart, amcinonide is a high-potent topical steroid cream. Topical steroids that are weaker than amcinonide are as follows:

  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented Diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate
  • Hydrocortisone probutate
  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than amcinonide?

These topical steroid creams are stronger than amcinonide: 

  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Clobetasol propionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Flurandrenolide 4 mcg/cm2
  • Halobetasol propionate

 

What happens when you use amcinonide too often?

If you use amcinonide too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Amcinonide is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does amcinonide cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to amcinonide. Amcinonide is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

 

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just amcinonide) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies.

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

 

Disclaimer: The information on this website is not medical advice. There is no known medical cure for topical steroid withdrawal, but there are solutions to manage the symptoms and inflammation. It should not be mistaken that all usage of steroid creams will cause topical steroid withdrawal. Corticosteroid creams are the most common medical treatment for eczema worldwide. More clinical research is required to understand the cause of Topical Steroid Withdrawal within an individual.

 

Side Effects of Fluticasone propionate

Fluticasone propionate is a type of topical corticosteroid. A corticosteroid is a type of steroid hormone that is produced by the adrenal gland. Corticosteroids are involved in a variety of body processes, including the stress response, immune system function, and inflammation.

 

What is Fluticasone propionate used for?

Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic corticosteroid that is used to treat various skin conditions, such as eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. It works by reducing inflammation and itching. Fluticasone propionate is also available as a cream, ointment, and solution.

 

Fluticasone propionate brand names

Fluticasone propionate is the generic name of the topical steroid. The brand names of this drug are the following: 

 

United States: 

  • Cutivate, Beser

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using Fluticasone propionate?

This medicine is for use on the skin only. Do not get it in your eyes, mouth, or vagina. Do not use it on skin areas that have cuts, scrapes, or burns. Do not apply the ointment to your nipple or areola, if you are breastfeeding. If it does get on these areas, rinse it off right away with water.

 

How long does Fluticasone propionate stay in your system?

The amount of time that Fluticasone propionate stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that Fluticasone propionate can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Fluticasone propionate is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of Fluticasone propionate and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use Fluticasone propionate for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of Fluticasone propionate?

According to Mayo Clinic, the use of fluticasone propionate may have side effects. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

 

Less common

  • Burning, itching, redness, or stinging of the skin
  • hives or welts, skin rash
  • raised, dark red, wart-like spots on the skin, especially when used on the face

 

Rare

  • Burning, itching, and pain in hairy areas, pus at the root of the hair

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply Fluticasone propionate to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying Fluticasone propionate to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Fluticasone propionate also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

How do I taper down from using Fluticasone propionate?

To taper down from using Fluticasone propionate many doctors advise adjusting to using a weaker steroid cream over an extended period of time. This is commonly known as climbing down the topical steroid ladder.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than Fluticasone propionate?

Fluticasone propionate is a high-potent topical steroid. Weaker steroid creams down the Topical Steroid Potency Strength Chart are as follows:

  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate
  • Hydrocortisone probutate
  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than Fluticasone propionate?

Stronger topical steroids than fluticasone propionate are as follows: 

  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Clobetasol propionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Flurandrenolide 4 mcg/cm2
  • Halobetasol propionate
  • Amcinonide
  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate

 

What happens when you use Fluticasone propionate too often?

If you use Fluticasone propionate too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Fluticasone propionate is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does Fluticasone propionate cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to Fluticasone propionate. Fluticasone propionate is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

 

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just Fluticasone propionate) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies.

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

 

Disclaimer: The information on this website is not medical advice. There is no known medical cure for topical steroid withdrawal, but there are solutions to manage the symptoms and inflammation. It should not be mistaken that all usage of steroid creams will cause topical steroid withdrawal. Corticosteroid creams are the most common medical treatment for eczema worldwide. More clinical research is required to understand the cause of Topical Steroid Withdrawal within an individual.

 

Side Effects of Diflorasone diacetate

Diflorasone diacetate is a type of corticosteroid medication that is used to treat various skin conditions. Corticosteroids are a class of drugs that reduce inflammation in the body. Diflorasone diacetate specifically works by inhibiting the production of inflammatory substances in the skin.

 

What is diflorasone diacetate used for?

Diflorasone diacetate can be used to treat a variety of inflammatory skin conditions, such as eczema, psoriasis, and seborrheic dermatitis. It is also sometimes used to treat insect bites, poison ivy, and other minor skin irritations.

 

Diflorasone diacetate is typically applied to the affected area of skin once or twice per day. It is important to follow the instructions of your doctor or pharmacist when using this medication. Be sure to wash your hands before and after applying diflorasone diacetate.

 

Diflorasone diacetate brand names

Diflorasone diacetate is a generic name of the drug. Below are the list of brand names used:

 

United states: 

Apexicon, Apexicon E, Maxiflor, Psorcon, Psorcon E

 

Canada:

Florone, Flutone

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using diflorasone diacetate?

Only the skin may be treated with this medicine. Avoid using diflorasone topical on the face, in the vaginal and rectal areas, as well as in skin folds and armpits, unless your doctor instructs you to. Do not let diflorasone topical get into your eyes or mouth, and do not ingest it.

 

Avoid using tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants while applying diflorasone to a child’s diaper area. Side effects could worsen with such use.

 

How long does diflorasone diacetate stay in your system?

The amount of time that diflorasone diacetate stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that diflorasone diacetate can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Diflorasone diacetate is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of diflorasone diacetate and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use diflorasone diacetate for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of diflorasone diacetate?

According to MedlinePlus, diflorasone diacetate may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • burning, itching, irritation, redness, or drying or cracking of the skin
  • acne
  • rash
  • increased hair growth
  • change in skin color
  • bruising or shiny skin
  • tiny red bumps or rash around the mouth
  • small white or red bumps on the skin

 

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • redness, swelling, oozing pus or other signs of skin infection in the place where you applied diflorasone
  • changes in the way fat is spread around the body
  • sudden weight gain
  • unusual tiredness
  • muscle weakness
  • depression and irritability

 

Children who use topical diflorasone may be more likely to experience negative side effects, such as reduced growth and delayed weight gain. Discuss the dangers of giving your child medication topically with your doctor.

 

There may be more negative effects with diflorasone. If you experience any strange issues while taking this drug, call your doctor right away.

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply diflorasone diacetate to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying diflorasone diacetate to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Diflorasone diacetate also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

How do I taper down from using diflorasone diacetate?

To taper down from using diflorasone diacetate many doctors advise adjusting to using a weaker steroid cream over an extended period of time. This is commonly known as climbing down the topical steroid ladder.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than diflorasone diacetate?

Diflorasone diacetate is a super-potent topical steroid according to the Topical Steroid Potency Strength Chart. Below are the topical steroids weaker than diflorasone diacetate:

  • Fluocinonide
  • Flurandrenolide 4 mcg/cm2
  • Halobetasol propionate
  • Amcinonide
  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate
  • Hydrocortisone probutate
  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than diflorasone diacetate?

The following are topical steroids that are stronger than diflorasone diacetate: 

  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Clobetasol propionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented diflorasone diacetate

 

What happens when you use diflorasone diacetate too often?

If you use diflorasone diacetate too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Diflorasone diacetate is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does diflorasone diacetate cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to diflorasone diacetate. Diflorasone diacetate is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

 

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just diflorasone diacetate) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies.

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

 

Disclaimer: The information on this website is not medical advice. There is no known medical cure for topical steroid withdrawal, but there are solutions to manage the symptoms and inflammation. It should not be mistaken that all usage of steroid creams will cause topical steroid withdrawal. Corticosteroid creams are the most common medical treatment for eczema worldwide. More clinical research is required to understand the cause of Topical Steroid Withdrawal within an individual.

 

Side Effects of Hydrocortisone probutate

Hydrocortisone probutate is a prescription medication used to treat a variety of skin conditions. It belongs to a class of drugs called corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are hormones that are produced naturally by the adrenal glands. They have many functions, including reducing inflammation.

 

What is Hydrocortisone probutate used for?

Hydrocortisone probutate is a topical steroid that is used to treat inflammation and itching associated with certain skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin conditions. It is available in a cream, ointment, or solution.

 

Hydrocortisone probutate brand names

Here is the list of brand names that are used for hydrocortisone probutate: 

 

United States

  • Pandel

 

Canada

  • Barriere-Hc
  • Cortate
  • Cort-Eze
  • Cortoderm Mild Ointment
  • Cortoderm Regular Ointment
  • Emo-Cort
  • Emo-Cort Scalp Solution
  • Hydrocortisone Cream
  • Novo-Hydrocort
  • Novo-Hydrocort Cream
  • Prevex Hc
  • Sarna Hc

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using Hydrocortisone probutate?

Only the skin should be used for this medication. Keep it out of your eyes. It should not be applied to skin that has been burned, scraped, or cut. Rinse it off with water as soon as possible if it does get on these locations.

 

If your doctor hasn’t instructed you to, avoid using this medication for longer than two weeks on your face, groin, or underarms.

 

Only skin diseases that your doctor is treating with this medication should be used. If you think there might be a skin infection present, specifically, consult your doctor before using it for any other conditions. This medicine should not be used to treat certain kinds of skin infections or conditions, including severe burns.

 

How long does Hydrocortisone probutate stay in your system?

The amount of time that Hydrocortisone probutate stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that Hydrocortisone probutate can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Hydrocortisone probutate is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of Hydrocortisone probutate and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use Hydrocortisone probutate for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of Hydrocortisone probutate?

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

  • Backache
  • blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, flaking, irritation, itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, stinging, or swelling of the skin
  • burning, itching, and pain in the hairy areas, pus at the root of the hair
  • burning and itching of the skin with pinhead-sized red blisters
  • darkening of the skin
  • blurred vision
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • dry mouth
  • facial hair growth in females
  • fainting
  • fractures
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • full or round face, neck, or trunk
  • increased hunger or thirst
  • increase urination
  • increased hair growth on the forehead, back, arms, and legs
  • irritability
  • lightening of the normal skin color
  • lightening of treated areas of the dark skin
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of sexual desire or ability
  • menstrual irregularities
  • mental depression
  • muscle wasting
  • nausea
  • reddish purple lines on the arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin
  • redness and scaling around the mouth
  • softening of the skin
  • stomach pain
  • sweating
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (eg, between the fingers)
  • thinning, weakness, or wasting away of the skin
  • trouble breathing
  • unexplained weight loss
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply Hydrocortisone probutate to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying Hydrocortisone probutate to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Hydrocortisone probutate also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

How do I taper down from using Hydrocortisone probutate?

To taper down from using hydrocortisone probutate many doctors advise adjusting to using a weaker steroid cream over an extended period of time. This is commonly known as climbing down the topical steroid ladder.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than Hydrocortisone probutate?

According to the Topical Steroid Potency Strength Chart, hydrocortisone probutate is a medium-strength topical steroid. Below is the list of the topical steroids weaker than hydrocortisone probutate: 

  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than Hydrocortisone probutate?

Here are the topical steroids stronger than hydrocortisone probutate: 

  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Clobetasol propionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Flurandrenolide 4 mcg/cm2
  • Halobetasol propionate
  • Amcinonide
  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate
  • Amcinonide
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate

 

What happens when you use Hydrocortisone probutate too often?

If you use Hydrocortisone probutate too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Hydrocortisone probutate is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does Hydrocortisone probutate cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to Hydrocortisone probutate. Hydrocortisone probutate is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

 

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just Hydrocortisone probutate) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies.

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

 

Disclaimer: The information on this website is not medical advice. There is no known medical cure for topical steroid withdrawal, but there are solutions to manage the symptoms and inflammation. It should not be mistaken that all usage of steroid creams will cause topical steroid withdrawal. Corticosteroid creams are the most common medical treatment for eczema worldwide. More clinical research is required to understand the cause of Topical Steroid Withdrawal within an individual.

 

Side Effects of Halobetasol propionate

Halobetasol propionate is a medication used on the skin to treat various skin conditions. It belongs to a class of drugs called corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are hormones that are produced naturally by the adrenal gland.

 

What is halobetasol propionate used for?

Halobetasol propionate can be used to treat a variety of skin conditions, including eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. Halobetasol propionate is typically applied to the affected area of skin once or twice daily. Halobetasol propionate is also available in the form of an ointment, cream, or lotion. It is important to follow the instructions of your healthcare provider when using this medication.

 

Halobetasol propionate brand names

Halobetasol propionate is the generic name of the drug. The following are the brand names of this drug: 

 

United States: 

Ultravate, Ultravate X, Bryhali, Lexette

 

Which body parts should be avoided when using halobetasol propionate?

Use this medicine only topically. However, unless specifically instructed to do so by your doctor, avoid using it on the face, groin, or underarms.

 

Avoid getting the medication in your eyes while applying it close to your eyes because doing so could exacerbate or even start glaucoma. Avoid getting this drug in your mouth or nose as well.

 

Only use this medication as prescribed to treat the specified ailment. Apply as indicated, but do not use it more frequently or for a longer period of time than your doctor has advised.

 

How long does halobetasol propionate stay in your system?

The amount of time that halobetasol propionate stays in your system is dependent on the duration of use of the medicine. Some research suggests that suppression of cortisol levels is still apparent 96 hours after topical use of corticosteroid creams, which implies that halobetasol propionate can stay in your system for long periods of time, possibly for up to a few weeks. Halobetasol propionate is not recommended for long term use. More research is required about the half-life of halobetasol propionate and how long it stays in your system. 

 

According to the NHS, for people who use halobetasol propionate for extended periods of time (more than 12 months in adults), a withdrawal reaction may occur which can include:

  • redness or changes in skin color (hyperpigmentation)
  • burning, stinging, itching or peeling of the skin, or oozing, open sores

 

What are the side effects of halobetasol propionate?

According to Mayo Clinic, the use of halobetasol propionate can have side effects. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

 

Less common

  • Blisters under the skin
  • burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles”, or tingling feelings
  • dry skin
  • flushing or redness of the skin
  • headache
  • hives or welts, itching, skin rash
  • raised, dark red, wart-like spots on the skin, especially when used on the face
  • stinging
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (eg, between the fingers)
  • unusually warm skin

 

Incidence not known

  • Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin
  • redness and scaling around the mouth
  • scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin

 

There are certain potential side effects that often do not require medical treatment. During therapy, these side effects could fade away as your body gets used to the medication. Additionally, your healthcare provider might be able to provide you with information on how to avoid or lessen some of these adverse effects. If any of the following side effects persist, are troublesome, or if you have any questions about them, speak with your doctor:

 

Less common

  • Acne or pimples
  • burning and itching of the skin with pinhead-sized red blisters

 

Incidence not known

  • Burning, itching, and pain in hairy areas, or pus at the root of the hair
  • earache
  • fever
  • increased hair growth on the forehead, back, arms, and legs
  • lightening of normal skin color
  • lightening of treated areas of dark skin
  • muscle aches
  • painful blisters on the trunk of the body
  • reddish purple lines on the arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin
  • redness or swelling in the ear
  • sore throat
  • stuffy or runny nose
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

 

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

 

Why does my skin burn when I apply halobetasol propionate to my skin?

If your skin burns after applying halobetasol propionate to your skin, you may have an allergic reaction to the steroid cream and your skin cannot tolerate it. Halobetasol propionate also contains cetostearyl alcohol which may cause acute allergic reactions.

 

How do I taper down from using Halobetasol propionate?

To taper down from using Halobetasol propionate many doctors advise adjusting to using a weaker steroid cream over an extended period of time. This is commonly known as climbing down the topical steroid ladder.

 

Which steroid creams are weaker than halobetasol propionate?

Halobetasol propionate is a super-potent topical steroid cream according to the Topical Steroid Potency Strength Chart. Below are the topical steroid weaker than halobetasol propionate: 

  • Amcinonide
  • Betamethasone dipropionate
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented Diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Halcinonide
  • Mometasone furoate
  • Fluticasone propionate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide 0.5%
  • Betamethasone valerate
  • Fluocinolone acetonide
  • Flurandrenolide
  • Hydrocortisone valerate
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Betamethasone valerate 0.1%
  • Clocortolone pivalate
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate
  • Hydrocortisone probutate
  • Hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%
  • Prednicarbate
  • Alclometasone dipropionate
  • Desonide 0.05%
  • Hydrocortisone 0.5% – 2.5%
  • Hydrocortisone

 

Which steroid creams are stronger than halobetasol propionate?

Below are the topical steroids stronger than halobetasol propionate: 

  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate
  • Clobetasol propionate
  • Desoximetasone
  • Augmented diflorasone diacetate
  • Diflorasone diacetate
  • Fluocinonide
  • Flurandrenolide 4 mcg/cm2

 

What happens when you use halobetasol propionate too often?

If you use halobetasol propionate too frequently or for an extended period of time, tolerance or tachyphylaxis to that potency level of steroid cream may develop. Halobetasol propionate is not recommended for extended use which may result in some of the common side effects listed above. Consult with your doctor if you have concerns. 

 

Does halobetasol propionate cause topical steroid withdrawal?

More research is required to understand the complexity of Topical Steroid Withdrawal and its specific connection to halobetasol propionate. Halobetasol propionate is a highly potent corticosteroid commonly used for skin conditions and the side effects of discontinuing the use of this topical steroid medicine is yet to be studied.

 

Throughout online groups and communities, there are serious concerns, accounts, discussions and images about corticosteroid creams (not just halobetasol propionate) causing Topical Steroid Withdrawal. The accounts and experiences of the Topical Steroid Withdrawal community continues to grow and has gathered media wide attention for the aesthetic physical severity of many suffering. 

 

Topical Steroid Withdrawal is an iatrogenic health phenomena that requires more research and studies. The International Topical Steroid Awareness Network (ITSAN) is currently building a patient registry to begin preliminary studies.

 

Is there treatment for Topical Steroid Withdrawal?

At TSW Assist, we are identifying crowd sourced recommendations of products, solutions, routines, treatments, therapies that can help manage the inflammation and symptoms during the withdrawal period from topical steroids. Currently, there is no medical cure for Topical Steroid Withdrawal. 

 

Through the community, we are finding treatments to manage the symptoms of TSW, through the tracking of the efficacy of specific products and solutions.

 

Treatment for Managing Topical Steroid Withdrawal

 

Disclaimer: The information on this website is not medical advice. There is no known medical cure for topical steroid withdrawal, but there are solutions to manage the symptoms and inflammation. It should not be mistaken that all usage of steroid creams will cause topical steroid withdrawal. Corticosteroid creams are the most common medical treatment for eczema worldwide. More clinical research is required to understand the cause of Topical Steroid Withdrawal within an individual.